GCCA In the News

Recent CBS Story on Unlicensed Care

CBS Atlanta 46

Funding, access hurt model pre-k program

By Nancy Badertscher, Atlanta Journal Constitution

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Salvador: Questions to Ask Potential Summer Camps to Protect Your Children

By Carolyn Salvador, Macon Telegraph, 4/5/2013

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Day Care Rule Changes on the Way

By Heather Duncan, Macon Telegraph, 3/18/2013

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Audit finds potential abuse in child care program

By Nancy Baderstcher, Atlanta Journal Constitution 3/15/2013

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House overwhelmingly approves FBI fingerprint checks for childcare center workers

By Nancy Baderstcher, Atlanta Journal Constitution 3/5/2013

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Are Fingerprint Checks on Horizon for ALL Daycare Workers?

By Mike Klein, Georgia Public Policy, 2/20/13

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Progressive Christian Academy’s troubles spur possible new day care rules

By Maggie Lee, The Macon Telegraph, 2/13/2013

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Kennesaw day care director: Multiple layers of security ensure children are protected

By Noreen Cochran, The Marietta Daily Journal 2/9/2013

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Georgia Pre K Program Lifts Students, study says

By Nancy Badertscher, Atlanta Journal Constitution 1/25/13

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Gov. Deal Steering Hope to Workforce Gaps

By Dave Williams, Atlanta Business Chronicle 1/25/13

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FBI Fingerprint Checks Could Make Day Care Safer for Kids

By Mike Klein, Georgia Public Policy, 1/11/2013

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NEWS/ WSBTV, June 29, 2012

Georgia cracking down on day care transportation

The state of Georgia is cracking down on day care providers that leave children unattended in a center's vehicle.

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NEWS/ Macon Telegraph, July 1, 2012

Economy forcing day care closures, report states

By Heather Duncan

This is an industry under stress,” said Carolyn Salvador, executive director of the Georgia Child Care Association. Since the recession, child care providers often absorb losses by allowing families to pay less or pay late when they suffer unemployment or struggle as they work multiple jobs, she said.

“Child care is often one of the last expenses paid,” Salvador said. “Those weathering the storm are doing so with decreased tuition revenue.”

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NEWS/ METRO Atlanta Journal Constitution, June 29, 2012

Regulators seek to prevent daycares from leaving children in hot vehicles

By Rhonda Cook

"We are for quality [care] and we do support DECL," said Frank Bennett who owns Kids Are Kids on Johnson Ferry Road in Marietta. "We think people need to be held accountable and need to meet the standard when it comes to children's safety."

Bennett said adjusting to the rule changes last year was no trouble but still "a little more cumbersome. But again, when it comes to children's safety, it's something we're supportive of," he said.

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NEWS/ My Fox Atlanta, June 29, 2012

Fines increasing for child day care centers, Associated Press

Georgia Childcare Association president Hows King said the threat of closure will command more attention from centers."There are well-meaning people, and there's oversight when people make mistakes," King said. "We're humans. It's very unfortunate, but we can't lose our diligence at any time. I truly believe that the measures implemented today will help reinsure that diligence."

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NEWS/ Macon Telegraph, June 26, 2012

Ga. day care quality could benefit from change in subsidy

By Heather Duncan

A 2011 market study conducted by Georgia universities shows families with subsidies can afford only about 25 percent of local day cares, said Carolyn Salvador, executive director of the Georgia Child Care Association.

This gap between the subsidy and the cost of care has driven poor children into lower-quality care and makes it difficult for many day cares to survive, Salvador said

But Salvador, whose organization supports the Quality Rated program and has advocated for tiered reimbursement, said the base subsidy is a separate issue.

Her association is lobbying legislators to use federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families money to increase the day care subsidy. Georgia used to transfer $30 million of the $330 million it received through TANF for day care, but replaced that with federal stimulus money when it was available. When the stimulus ended, the money wasn’t replaced, she said

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METRO ATLANTA/STATE NEWS Atlanta Journal Constitution, June 4, 2012

It’s a New Day for Pre K Oversight

By Nancy Badertscher

Carolyn Salvador, executive director of the Georgia Child Care Association, said Cagle won over advocates early in his administration when he asked for a lunch with them.

“He said, ‘I really like to involve stakeholders and have a variety of voices.’ And he’s been true to his word,” Salvador said. “We might not always see eye to eye, but he’s been very responsive. And that’s been a real 180.”

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NEWS/ Jacksonville Florida Times Union May 31, 2012

Georgia Preschool Teachers Earn Bonus

Walter C Jones, Morris News Service

The government's bonus-and-scholarship offers mesh with efforts the preschool industry has pushed for some time, according to Carolyn Salvador of the Georgia Child Care Association.

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NEWS/ Rome News Tribune May 31, 2012

Georgia Preschool Teachers Earn Bonus

Walter C Jones, Morris News Service

The government's bonus-and-scholarship offers mesh with efforts the preschool industry has pushed for some time, according to Carolyn Salvador of the Georgia Child Care Association.

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METRO ATLANTA/STATE NEWS Atlanta Journal Constitution, April 25, 2012

Some Day Care is Unlicensed

By Tim Eberly

“Parents don’t know a difference,” conspicuous Carolyn Salvador, executive of Georgia Child Care Association, that represents day caring owners. “They assume that they’re putting [their children] in there and someone is watching.”

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NEWS/ CBS TV Atlanta, February 14, 2012

No State Oversight on After School Programs

The lack of oversight concerns Carolyn Salvador, the executive director of the Georgia Child Care Association, which represents licensed childcare facilities. "Exempt or unlicensed programs don't have to meet any safety requirements. You have people working there that don't have background checks, there's no safety requirements," said Salvador.

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NEWS/METRO ATLANTA, Atlanta Journal Constitution, October 5, 2011

The Scary Side of Day Care

By Tim Eberly

Carolyn Salvador, executive director of Georgia Child Care Association, which represents child care providers said the state historically has not revoked many licenses. But Salvador says she isn’t concerned about the AJC’s findings because the state is steadily improving oversight. Salvador said DECAL has recently strengthened its rules, used federal money to help troubled centers improve and is working on rolling out a larger incentive-based program to raise quality of child care.

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NEWS/ LOCAL: WSBTV, September 15, 2011

Investigation shows large number of children left in hot vans

“is a worst nightmare ever for any child care center owner” GCCA Executive Director Carolyn Salvador said….

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FOX 5: GOOD DAY ATLANTA, July 29, 2011

Finding the Right After School Facility

“Parents need to walk in and find out if that after school program is licensed. The majority of after school programs are actually licensed and should be licensed. There are some programs that have sought an exemption to licensing, but they either need to be licensed or exempt from licensing “said Carolyn Salvador of the Georgia Child Care Association.


NEWS/ LOCAL: WSBTV, Monday June 27, 2011

Agency May 'Strengthen Oversight' After Day Care Death

Aaron Diamant

Diamant went to see Georgia Child Care Association Director Carolyn Salvador for some insight.

“I think that they’re just going to go back and really do due diligence and look at that process to see if there’s really anything in place that they can do to sure-guard about children’s safety and transportation to make sure that they are keeping children as safe as possible,” Salvador explained.

However, Salvador noted there are already several transportation safeguards in place, which providers must follow. She said more rules might help prevent more deaths, but not necessarily.

“We need to make sure that they’re following them to protect children,” Salvador said. “We want to understand what went wrong in the process, and what DECAL means by those things.”

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FOX NEWS FOCUS, April 13, 2011

Pre K Program in Jeopardy

Tom Haynes

Carolyn Salvador, director of the Georgia Child Care Association stopped by Fox 5 studios Tuesday to examine the issue. Salvador says there are other options from shortening school days or the school year, to increasing Pre K class size to serve more students.


NEWS/LOCAL/STATE: Atlanta Journal Constitution, February 2, 2011

Deal proposes cuts to pre-k funding

By Nancy Badertsher

These cuts (that Deal has proposed), if not restored will have a big impact on providers who are already hurting and underfunded by this program” said Carolyn Salvador, executive director of the Georgia Child Care Association

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ATLANTA WEATHER: Atlanta Journal Constitution, January 12, 2011

Snow and Kids? How are parents faring?

By Grace Bonds Staples

Indeed bad weather days like these can put tremendous strain on parents with young children; especially those who still must report to work and figure out what to do for child care, said Carolyn Salvador, executive director of the Georgia Child Care Association which has about 700 members. How many does that really impact, I’m not sure she said. I don’t know the actual population working on a day like today really is. If a child care center is open, however, Salvador estimated Tuesday that only 5 percent to 10 percent of the children they serve were actually able to reach them.

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NEWS/ Macon Telegraph, November 28, 2010

Child Care for Disabled Kids Hard to Find in Midstate

By Heather Duncan

Carolyn Salvador, executive director of the Georgia Child Care Association, said the state needs to provide more support -- both training and funding -- to help day cares fulfill this role. Salvador said additional staffing is generally the biggest concern.

“I think it’s when they’re fearful that, ‘I’m already strapped! I can’t afford to hire an extra teacher!’ ” -- incorrectly assuming they would always have to provide one-on-one care.

Salvador, who long ran her own day care in Duluth, gave an example of how behavioral issues affect a day care business.

“Say Little Johnny is throwing blocks at his classmates and he’s taking about 50 percent of the energy in the class,” she said. “You’re trying to get him help for his (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), and other parents are pushing to disenroll him.

“Then he starts hitting and biting, and now you’re accommodating for that child but you’ve hurt the learning environment for the other children. So your choice is people disenroll, or you pay an extra teacher with no extra pay from parents.”

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WXIA: 11 ALIVE NEWS Atlanta: 7/27/2010 6:32:14 PM

They Care for Children, But Fly Below Regulatory Radar

Posted By - Doug Richards

"And their children may not really be protected the way they want them to be," said Carolyn Salvador, director of the Georgia Child Care Association, an advocacy group for licensed day care centers.

Across the street from the Song Moo Do martial arts center, there's a day care center whose staff have to undergo criminal background checks, learn CPR, and get health and sanitary training.  That's because it has a state license and is subject to regular state inspections.

"I don't think parents realize, when they put children in an after-school program, that some after-school programs don't have to meet these requirements," said Salvador.

Salvador says the rules are unfair to licensed day care centers, which frequently compete for business with unlicensed facilities.  She says parents also expect the same state oversight for both types of facilities

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NEWS LOCAL/STATE: Macon Telegraph, Sunday, Aug. 22, 2010

Fees strain parents, but centers still barely paying the bills

By S. HEATHER DUNCAN - hduncan@macon.com

Although the cost of day care may be a strain for many Georgia families, in 2009 it was still among the nations cheapest as a proportion of median income, a study by the NACCRRA found.

“That’s great, but that also tells us we’re not being greedy,” said Carolyn Salvador, executive director of the Georgia Child Care Association, which represents licensed child care providers. “We’re not pushing the envelope on tuition, and we’re not paying our staff that much.”

Salvador said a public education campaign is needed.

“If you go buy a Mercedes, you know it’s a high-quality product, so you expect to pay more,” said Salvador, who used to own a nationally accredited day care center herself. “But parents don’t understand what high-quality child care is, and so they don’t expect to pay more.”

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NEWS LOCAL/STATE: Macon Telegraph, Monday, Aug. 23, 2010

Operators: State subsidy drives families into low-quality day care

By Heather Duncan

At some day care centers, 95 percent of the children receive subsidies, said Carolyn Salvador, executive director of the Georgia Child Care Association.

“How can they ever get extra money to pay staff or buy better supplies? And God forbid a bus breaks down or the air conditioning blows,” she said. “Centers that are catering to low-income families have a suppressed market rate and certainly don’t have any money to increase the quality of their programs.”

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NEWS: LOCAL/STATE: Gwinnett Daily Post, May 8, 2010

Experts: Poor child care is a troubling trend

Reporter: By Josh Green

In light of recent child deaths across the country, in Georgia and Gwinnett, child advocates are warning parents of the inherent risks of unlicensed child care facilities, home daycares and summer camps, especially as summer dawns, schools break and an economic malaise has contributed to the shuttering of 600 reputable child care centers in Georgia.

Carolyn Salvador’s blood would boil when she watched the children pile into the Hyundai — two in the front seat, unbuckled, about four in the back — and then be driven off to an after-school karate program, caution to the wind.

Salvador, then owner of a Duluth child development center, said the children were under the auspices of an unlicensed daycare that not only competed with her more qualified business by offering cut rates, but unwittingly ushered the kids into harm’s way.

“Parents had no idea they were unlicensed. They just thought they were cheaper — a better bargain,” said Salvador, Georgia Child Care Association executive director. “Of course, it was because (the caretakers) didn’t have the cost of adhering to any regulations.”

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Metro Atlanta / State News: Atlanta Journal Constitution, Monday, July 5, 2010

Economy hits Georgia child care hard; 600 centers forced to shut

By Gracie Bonds Staples

The state carries an increased burden because it has a higher rate of single moms who need subsidized care, making it imperative that child care be kept affordable, said Carolyn Salvador, Georgia Child Care Association executive director.

“Then you have the other underlying current that we have to increase quality, but quality costs money,” Salvador said. “We would have loved to have seen money from the licensing fees go back to help early care and learning, but instead it will go to the general state budget.”

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OPINION: Atlanta Journal Constitution Monday, March 1, 2010

Georgia child care can be safer, even more affordable

By Carolyn Salvador

The 6-month-old baby who died last week while under the care of a sitter operating in a Riverdale hotel room is a tragic reminder of the perils of improperly supervised child care. Safety is a high priority for parents seeking child care. Unfortunately, when selecting child care that fits their budget, parents may unintentionally be putting their children’s safety at risk by placing them with unlicensed providers.

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OPINION: Savannah Morning News, April 20, 2010

Salvador: State's day-care centers struggling

By Carolyn Salvador

A recent survey from the non-profit agency Quality Care for Children found that approximately 600 licensed child care centers in Georgia closed their doors in 2009 due to the economy, a 19 percent drop from last year.

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